MyCharge Battery Backup Important for Smart Health Devices

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MyCharge-HubOne thing that many people don’t consider for their smartphone and other portable health tech devices is where they’ll get backup power when they are mobile. MyCharge is probably the best option for this need. Health Tech Weekly host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic stopped by the MyCharge booth to get a look inside their private area and look over the selection of highly personalized backup charging tools there.

MyCharge mobile charging solutions are the mobile battery backups of choice for Jamie and his family because of their solid construction, innovative and sleek design and the host of accompanying features that make ease of use perfect for nearly any situation. They make it easy to charge your devices with built-in cables for your smartphones and USB charging devices and many of their products have built-in AC prongs so you can just flip them open and plug right into any wall outlet to recharge the battery.

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That will wrap up this episode of Health Tech Weekly. Make sure you follow up over at our website, HTWeekly.com, for more information on this and all of our episodes. There are additional resource links, links to trusted resources for living a healthier lifestyle and more. If you have a comment on this week’s episode please get back in touch with me either over at HTWeekly.com in comment links for each article or shoot me an email at podmedic@mac.com.

Quell Pain Relief with Electrical Stimulation Technology

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Quell-wearable-pain-reliefChronic musculoskeletal pain is a problem that millions of people in the United States deal with every day. Finding ways to deal with that pain that doesn’t always involve powerful and addictive drugs is problematic. That is what the folks at Neurometrix are dealing with using their Quell pain management device.

Health Tech Weekly host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic chatted with Neurometrix CEO Dr. Shai Gozani about the Quell while attending the International CES 2015 conference and expo in Las Vegas. The Quell is a neurostimulator device that you wear on the calf. It works by sending small electric signals to the nerves in the leg and kind of “distracts” the brain from some or all of the pain suffered by a person.

This FDA approved device will be available in the spring 2015 and will cost around $250.00. To find out more about the Quell visit QuellRelief.com and get a handle on your chronic pain.

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That will wrap up this episode of Health Tech Weekly. Make sure you follow up over at our website, HTWeekly.com, for more information on this and all of our episodes. There are additional resource links, links to trusted resources for living a healthier lifestyle and more. If you have a comment on this week’s episode please get back in touch with me either over at HTWeekly.com in comment links for each article or shoot me an email at podmedic@mac.com.

Diabetes Management Tools From Vigilant Change Lives

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Health Tech Weekly host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic got the chance to interview Richard Binier from USVigilant.com about their diabetes management tools. Their award-winning tools like the Bee Insulin dose tracking device help diabetes patients manage their illnesses better and keep them healthier than those who may not be using these types of tools.

vigilant-bee-insulin-trackerThe Bee from Vigilant attaches to most commercially available insulin dosing pens and connects wirelessly to a smartphone app to track insulin dose amount and time for the patients. This is available now and other soon to be released diabetes management tools are coming soon!

The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes diabetes as a significant health care issue for the world. Finding new tools to help people manage and treat this disease is becoming increasingly important. The Bee from Vigilant is one such tool.

From the Bee’s own website we find out that 347 million people worldwide have diabetes. Managing their insulin injections and blood sugar levels is painstaking work, and often patients lose track. Bee helps patients by creating a log book of insulin injection and blood sugar level data which they may share with their loved ones and healthcare providers.

After every insulin injection,  simply twist the Bee to log the amount of insulin units injected and your blood sugar level. Then, press the cap and the data is beamed to a logbook your mobile device. If that device isn’t around at the moment, Bee saves the data for later transmission. The logbook is a convenient way to know exactly when and how much insulin you injected. If you choose, you can also share the logbook with your loved ones or healthcare provider.

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That will wrap up this episode of Health Tech Weekly. Make sure you follow up over at our website, HTWeekly.com, for more information on this and all of our episodes. There are additional resource links, links to trusted resources for living a healthier lifestyle and more. If you have a comment on this week’s episode please get back in touch with me either over at HTWeekly.com in comment links for each article or shoot me an email at podmedic@mac.com.

Tablet Sign Language Interpreter for Deaf and Hearing Impaired

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This week on the Health Tech Weekly Podcast I found a neat item over at Medgadget that talks about a new mobile tablet app that can interpret sign language from deaf or hearing impaired people using its internal camera. That’s what mobile app software company MotionaSavvy has been working on. They’ve come up with a new technology called UNI that includes a mobile app, tablet device and a specially designed smart case.

The case has multiple cameras built in that are designed to capture the motion of hands and arms of a hearing impaired person so that their sign language can be interpreted into text and the spoken word. The built in app handles the processing and can also take spoken words and turn them into text for the hearing impaired person. The team at MotionSavvy have also made the app so it can learn from its mistakes and adapt its understanding of signs to accommodate certain dialects of sign language for different areas.

With over 370 million people worldwide with a hearing impairment, the ability for them to communicate with the hearing world around them is important. I’ll keep monitoring this innovation and bring you updates in the future as they become available. The team at MotionSavvy is also planning a home automation and living room TV based version of the UNI platform for the future. This could change the way hearing impaired persons communicate with their hearing friends, family and relatives.

This episode sponsored in part by CES Partner HearNotes.com.

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That will wrap up this episode of Health Tech Weekly. Make sure you follow up over at our website, HTWeekly.com, for more information on this and all of our episodes. There are additional resource links, links to trusted resources for living a healthier lifestyle and more. If you have a comment on this week’s episode please get back in touch with me either over at HTWeekly.com in comment links for each article or shoot me an email at podmedic@mac.com.

Daysy Fertility Thermometer and Smartphone App Help You Get Pregnant

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This week on the Health Tech Weekly Podcast is a tool for those couples out there who are trying to get pregnant. One way to improve the chances of getting pregnant is to have sex at certain times in the woman’s menstrual cycle. This can be tracked by carefully taking her temperature and trending the changes over time. But this is difficult for most people to do on their own.

Daysy-thermometer-1Enter Daysy, the most accurate, all-natural fertility management solution along with daysyView, a free, mobile app that can be used to augment the daysy or as a standalone tool to track ovulation cycles. Backed by the creators of Lady-Comp and supported by several clinical studies, daysy tracks ovulation cycles with an innovative thermometer that measures basal body temperature (BBT) orally.

The Daysy proprietary algorithm, developed with data from over one million cycles, uses advanced statistical methods to calculate fertility status with an accuracy of 99.3 percent. In comparison, other pregnancy planning and prevention methods, such as basic calendaring, condoms, birth control pills and intrauterine devices, average between 91 percent – 99.8 percent accuracy. The Daysy fertility thermometer is available now for sale online at Daysy.com or at Amazon.com. The DaysyView app is available now for download in the iTunes app store.

This episode sponsored in part by CES Partner HearNotes.com.

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That will wrap up this episode of Health Tech Weekly. Make sure you follow up over at our website, HTWeekly.com, for more information on this and all of our episodes. There are additional resource links, links to trusted resources for living a healthier lifestyle and more. If you have a comment on this week’s episode please get back in touch with me either over at HTWeekly.com in comment links for each article or shoot me an email at podmedic@mac.com.

HearNotes Give Completely Wireless Audio Experience

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I got the chance to interview the founder and CEO of HearNotes.com Patrick Donohue while in Vegas at the International CES Conference and Expo last week. He has come up with a completely wireless earbud design that is going to revolutionize the earbud paradigm.

To use them, you plug in the receiver to your sound source (a smart phone, iPod, tablet or computer) then you just put the right and left earbuds in. There is no cord connecting them. The HearNotes ear buds use a wireless protocol called KLEER that offers hi-fidelity lossless audio transmission to your ears. It’s truly an amazing listening experience.

Check out the interview with Patrick and see for yourself.

The Multi-Function FoneBud Offers a Companion to Your Smart Phone

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FoneBud came by the Tech Podcast booth at the International CES conference last week and talked with the Gadget Professor Don Baine about this new and innovative companion for your smart phone.

What does the FoneBud do? It has numerous functions. It acts as a bluetooth point of contact for your smartphone so you can talk on the FoneBud when your phone is charging across the room. It also acts as a charging battery bank for your smartphone when you need a charge.

Using the accompanying app, the button on the FoneBud can also be used as a selfie button for your phone. The Final function is as a LED flashlight which is also a task the FoneBud can accomplish to light your way. Check out the FoneBud at FoneBud.com.

BeZilch Puts You In The Driver’s Seat When Buy and Selling Used Phones

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At the International CES Conference and Expo this past week several companies stood out with innovative products and services. BeZilch was one of them. BeZilch is a marketplace through which you can buy or sell you used phones and devices.

Imagine all the old smartphones and tablets out there that still have a useful lifespan in them but people have moved on to a new device and want to sell the old one. If you’re in the market for a new device like one being sold in the BeZilch classifieds, you can purchase it immediately.

You also have the option to put your own “wanted” classified out there with a price you’re willing to pay. You won’t get paid immediately but someone may want to quickly get rid of their device to you for an immediate payout later after you post it. This is based on a marketplace concept where you can build more demand or increase supply of devices in order to manipulate the prices for them.

Check it out at BeZilch.com and start selling your own devices. You can also check out the interview we had with BeZilch in the Tech Podcast booth at CES and hear about the system for yourself.

New Smartphone App Detects Newborn Jaundice

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This week on the Health Tech Weekly Podcast let’s take a look at a pretty cool smart phone app that could help parents of newborns work with their nurses and pediatricians to assess their babies for neonatal or newborn jaundice. Programmers at the University of Washington worked together with doctors to create the Bilicam which comes up with an approximate bilirubin level based on a photograph of the baby’s skin color taken with a smartphone’s camera. Hyperbilirubinemia occurs in most, if not all neonates. As the newborn ages, eventually the level of bilirubin, a by product of the breakdown of red blood cells, usually decreases naturally.

newborn jaundice appThe question for many parents who have taken their new baby home is whether they need to take their baby back in for a blood test to follow up on it and get treatment, usually photo-therapy with ultraviolet light. The camera app works by using a color calibration card that is placed in the camera’s frame when the photo is taken. This gives the camera and the app software a known color value to gauge the skin against. Then the app examines the photograph taken and compares the values with a cloud-based algorithm to come up with an approximate bilirubin level.

The app is still in the research phase and the team at the University of Washington are planning on testing the app on 1000 newborns in coming months to further calibrate the system for different lighting and skin tones. I love to see this type of assessment tool coming to mobile devices because it means that for nurses like me, we will all have full diagnostic suites soon at our fingertips wherever we encounter our patients. Stay tuned for more on this and other mobile app breakthroughs here on Health Tech Weekly in future episodes.

This episode sponsored in part by CES Partner HearNotes.com.

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That will wrap up this episode of Health Tech Weekly. Make sure you follow up over at our website, HTWeekly.com, for more information on this and all of our episodes. There are additional resource links, links to trusted resources for living a healthier lifestyle and more. If you have a comment on this week’s episode please get back in touch with me either over at HTWeekly.com in comment links for each article or shoot me an email at podmedic@mac.com.

Click Chemistry Helps Diseases Fight Themselves

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click chemistryThis week on the Health Tech Weekly Podcast we take a look at what one group of researchers at the Scripps Research Institute is doing to create solutions to problems that have long plagued some patients. They are using a technology called Click Chemistry to take molecules existing only in diseased cells and getting them to create an attraction to other chemicals rendering the causative molecules inert.

This is being tried first with a particular form of muscular dystrophy where the very rogue RNA molecules that cause the disease were used to formulate their own inhibitors thus nullifying their effects. This is huge, not just for those who suffer from muscular dystrophy, but also for potential in other disease treatments.

The technology could also be applied to ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease), Huntington’s Disease and others for which there is no cure but which have a root cause by rogue RNA molecules in their cells. Stay tuned here to Health Tech Weekly for more segments on this in the future as there are more developments in the treatments.

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That will wrap up this episode of Health Tech Weekly. Make sure you follow up over at our website, HTWeekly.com, for more information on this and all of our episodes. There are additional resource links, links to trusted resources for living a healthier lifestyle and more. If you have a comment on this week’s episode please get back in touch with me either over at HTWeekly.com in comment links for each article or shoot me an email at podmedic@mac.com.