Diabetes Management Tools From Vigilant Change Lives

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Health Tech Weekly host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic got the chance to interview Richard Binier from USVigilant.com about their diabetes management tools. Their award-winning tools like the Bee Insulin dose tracking device help diabetes patients manage their illnesses better and keep them healthier than those who may not be using these types of tools.

vigilant-bee-insulin-trackerThe Bee from Vigilant attaches to most commercially available insulin dosing pens and connects wirelessly to a smartphone app to track insulin dose amount and time for the patients. This is available now and other soon to be released diabetes management tools are coming soon!

The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes diabetes as a significant health care issue for the world. Finding new tools to help people manage and treat this disease is becoming increasingly important. The Bee from Vigilant is one such tool.

From the Bee’s own website we find out that 347 million people worldwide have diabetes. Managing their insulin injections and blood sugar levels is painstaking work, and often patients lose track. Bee helps patients by creating a log book of insulin injection and blood sugar level data which they may share with their loved ones and healthcare providers.

After every insulin injection,  simply twist the Bee to log the amount of insulin units injected and your blood sugar level. Then, press the cap and the data is beamed to a logbook your mobile device. If that device isn’t around at the moment, Bee saves the data for later transmission. The logbook is a convenient way to know exactly when and how much insulin you injected. If you choose, you can also share the logbook with your loved ones or healthcare provider.

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That will wrap up this episode of Health Tech Weekly. Make sure you follow up over at our website, HTWeekly.com, for more information on this and all of our episodes. There are additional resource links, links to trusted resources for living a healthier lifestyle and more. If you have a comment on this week’s episode please get back in touch with me either over at HTWeekly.com in comment links for each article or shoot me an email at podmedic@mac.com.

Tablet Sign Language Interpreter for Deaf and Hearing Impaired

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This week on the Health Tech Weekly Podcast I found a neat item over at Medgadget that talks about a new mobile tablet app that can interpret sign language from deaf or hearing impaired people using its internal camera. That’s what mobile app software company MotionaSavvy has been working on. They’ve come up with a new technology called UNI that includes a mobile app, tablet device and a specially designed smart case.

The case has multiple cameras built in that are designed to capture the motion of hands and arms of a hearing impaired person so that their sign language can be interpreted into text and the spoken word. The built in app handles the processing and can also take spoken words and turn them into text for the hearing impaired person. The team at MotionSavvy have also made the app so it can learn from its mistakes and adapt its understanding of signs to accommodate certain dialects of sign language for different areas.

With over 370 million people worldwide with a hearing impairment, the ability for them to communicate with the hearing world around them is important. I’ll keep monitoring this innovation and bring you updates in the future as they become available. The team at MotionSavvy is also planning a home automation and living room TV based version of the UNI platform for the future. This could change the way hearing impaired persons communicate with their hearing friends, family and relatives.

This episode sponsored in part by CES Partner HearNotes.com.

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That will wrap up this episode of Health Tech Weekly. Make sure you follow up over at our website, HTWeekly.com, for more information on this and all of our episodes. There are additional resource links, links to trusted resources for living a healthier lifestyle and more. If you have a comment on this week’s episode please get back in touch with me either over at HTWeekly.com in comment links for each article or shoot me an email at podmedic@mac.com.

Daysy Fertility Thermometer and Smartphone App Help You Get Pregnant

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This week on the Health Tech Weekly Podcast is a tool for those couples out there who are trying to get pregnant. One way to improve the chances of getting pregnant is to have sex at certain times in the woman’s menstrual cycle. This can be tracked by carefully taking her temperature and trending the changes over time. But this is difficult for most people to do on their own.

Daysy-thermometer-1Enter Daysy, the most accurate, all-natural fertility management solution along with daysyView, a free, mobile app that can be used to augment the daysy or as a standalone tool to track ovulation cycles. Backed by the creators of Lady-Comp and supported by several clinical studies, daysy tracks ovulation cycles with an innovative thermometer that measures basal body temperature (BBT) orally.

The Daysy proprietary algorithm, developed with data from over one million cycles, uses advanced statistical methods to calculate fertility status with an accuracy of 99.3 percent. In comparison, other pregnancy planning and prevention methods, such as basic calendaring, condoms, birth control pills and intrauterine devices, average between 91 percent – 99.8 percent accuracy. The Daysy fertility thermometer is available now for sale online at Daysy.com or at Amazon.com. The DaysyView app is available now for download in the iTunes app store.

This episode sponsored in part by CES Partner HearNotes.com.

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That will wrap up this episode of Health Tech Weekly. Make sure you follow up over at our website, HTWeekly.com, for more information on this and all of our episodes. There are additional resource links, links to trusted resources for living a healthier lifestyle and more. If you have a comment on this week’s episode please get back in touch with me either over at HTWeekly.com in comment links for each article or shoot me an email at podmedic@mac.com.

New Smartphone App Detects Newborn Jaundice

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This week on the Health Tech Weekly Podcast let’s take a look at a pretty cool smart phone app that could help parents of newborns work with their nurses and pediatricians to assess their babies for neonatal or newborn jaundice. Programmers at the University of Washington worked together with doctors to create the Bilicam which comes up with an approximate bilirubin level based on a photograph of the baby’s skin color taken with a smartphone’s camera. Hyperbilirubinemia occurs in most, if not all neonates. As the newborn ages, eventually the level of bilirubin, a by product of the breakdown of red blood cells, usually decreases naturally.

newborn jaundice appThe question for many parents who have taken their new baby home is whether they need to take their baby back in for a blood test to follow up on it and get treatment, usually photo-therapy with ultraviolet light. The camera app works by using a color calibration card that is placed in the camera’s frame when the photo is taken. This gives the camera and the app software a known color value to gauge the skin against. Then the app examines the photograph taken and compares the values with a cloud-based algorithm to come up with an approximate bilirubin level.

The app is still in the research phase and the team at the University of Washington are planning on testing the app on 1000 newborns in coming months to further calibrate the system for different lighting and skin tones. I love to see this type of assessment tool coming to mobile devices because it means that for nurses like me, we will all have full diagnostic suites soon at our fingertips wherever we encounter our patients. Stay tuned for more on this and other mobile app breakthroughs here on Health Tech Weekly in future episodes.

This episode sponsored in part by CES Partner HearNotes.com.

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That will wrap up this episode of Health Tech Weekly. Make sure you follow up over at our website, HTWeekly.com, for more information on this and all of our episodes. There are additional resource links, links to trusted resources for living a healthier lifestyle and more. If you have a comment on this week’s episode please get back in touch with me either over at HTWeekly.com in comment links for each article or shoot me an email at podmedic@mac.com.

Click Chemistry Helps Diseases Fight Themselves

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click chemistryThis week on the Health Tech Weekly Podcast we take a look at what one group of researchers at the Scripps Research Institute is doing to create solutions to problems that have long plagued some patients. They are using a technology called Click Chemistry to take molecules existing only in diseased cells and getting them to create an attraction to other chemicals rendering the causative molecules inert.

This is being tried first with a particular form of muscular dystrophy where the very rogue RNA molecules that cause the disease were used to formulate their own inhibitors thus nullifying their effects. This is huge, not just for those who suffer from muscular dystrophy, but also for potential in other disease treatments.

The technology could also be applied to ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease), Huntington’s Disease and others for which there is no cure but which have a root cause by rogue RNA molecules in their cells. Stay tuned here to Health Tech Weekly for more segments on this in the future as there are more developments in the treatments.

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That will wrap up this episode of Health Tech Weekly. Make sure you follow up over at our website, HTWeekly.com, for more information on this and all of our episodes. There are additional resource links, links to trusted resources for living a healthier lifestyle and more. If you have a comment on this week’s episode please get back in touch with me either over at HTWeekly.com in comment links for each article or shoot me an email at podmedic@mac.com.

More Telemedicine and Digital Connections to Your Healthcare

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Midsection Of Shirtless Man And Heartbeat GraphThis week on the Health Tech Weekly Podcast we take another look at how telemedicine is helping to connect patients with their doctors without traveling hundreds of miles for appointments. Patients at Carle Hoopeston Regional Medical Center in Hoopeston, Illinois are now able to connect with their specialists over 50 miles away in Urbana using a telemedicine connection.

Small local hospitals around the country are seeing the same telemedicine improvements where they can get their specialist followup visits via this video phone connection, ask their doctor or nurse questions about their care and do it all relatively close to home. These local hospitals are also using other cutting edge technologies to leverage their community connections.

Carle Hoopeston is also using a smartphone app that patients can access and download. It allows them to connect to see emergency room wait times, followup appointment times and access their health records. All of these advancements are available because of the push to connect patients digitally and the initiatives to drive healthcare costs lower through innovative use of things like telemedicine connections.

Patients and healthcare providers both like the connection using big flatscreen TVs and HD web cameras. Some say it is just like being in the same room as the doctor. Look for technology like this soon in your community that will allow you to meet with your doctors closer to home and avoid traveling long distances and inconvenient trips to distant hospital centers.

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That will wrap up this episode of Health Tech Weekly. Make sure you follow up over at our website, HTWeekly.com, for more information on this and all of our episodes. There are additional resource links, links to trusted resources for living a healthier lifestyle and more. If you have a comment on this week’s episode please get back in touch with me either over at HTWeekly.com in comment links for each article or shoot me an email at podmedic@mac.com.

Video Game Tech Teaches Parents and Children About Surgeries

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Stanford-heart-repair-screenshot3This week on the Health Tech Weekly Podcast I found a great article on new avenues for patient and family education that is really cool. New video game style technology is now being used to help educate children and their family members about upcoming surgeries and procedures thanks to an initiative started by Stanford Children’s Health in the San Francisco Bay area.

Stanford Children’s Health collaborated with Lighthaus, Inc. a company that creates video game style animations to create educational, interactive 3D videos that help families understand congenital heart defects and the procedures used in surgery to correct them. Families don’t often understand the complicated 12-hour surgery used to correct these defects. They just sign on the dotted line and trust the medical team. This is not really informed consent, nor do you have an educated patient or caregiver who can help with care after the surgery.

The use of this type of creative animation can be used help many different types of patients understand what is going on with their conditions and health. According to the article, because the video education program is interactive, it allows the patients and family members to “help” complete the procedure in the simulation and that interaction creates much deeper understanding about what is occurring in the surgery. I look for other creative patient education techniques to continue to crop up as technology becomes more and more available for such things.

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That will wrap up this episode of Health Tech Weekly. Make sure you follow up over at our website, HTWeekly.com, for more information on this and all of our episodes. There are additional resource links, links to trusted resources for living a healthier lifestyle and more. If you have a comment on this week’s episode please get back in touch with me either over at HTWeekly.com in comment links for each article or shoot me an email at podmedic@mac.com.

Decoy Proteins Trick Cancer Cells To Stay In Place & Not Spread

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DNWord-StrandThis week on the Health Tech Weekly Podcast I have another exciting breakthrough in cancer treatment and management technology that might stop cancers from spreading throughout the body, allowing the cancer to be treated in it’s original location much more easily. The spread of cancer through the body from its original location is called metastasis. It’s often what makes cancer so hard to treat and ultimately fatal. So if scientists could find a way to stop that metastasis then we could get ahead of the cancer spread rather than constantly playing catchup.

That’s what the team at Stanford University did with their research into the way that the proteins Axl and Gas6 work together to help cancer spread through the body. Apparently when these proteins team up on the surface of cancer cells, they cause the cells to detach and move through the body to start cancer tumors or nodules elsewhere.

What the Stanford team did was create an Axl decoy protein that acts like the original version except it doesn’t allow the cell to detach from the tumor to travel around the body. This means that potentially, a cancer treatment team could inject these decoy proteins into the cancer patient while they are treating the original tumor through surgery, radiation or chemotherapy and slowing or stopping the spread of the tumor to other parts of the body.

Currently the treatment is showing promising results in laboratory mice with cancers, stopping the spread of new nodules by up to 78%. This type of genetic protein engineering is holding out hope for being a powerful new addition to the treatment of cancer buying the patient and treatment team valuable time to halt or slow the spread of the disease. Stay tuned here to Health Tech Weekly for more cancer treatment news in the future here on the show.

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That will wrap up this episode of Health Tech Weekly. Make sure you follow up over at our website, HTWeekly.com, for more information on this and all of our episodes. There are additional resource links, links to trusted resources for living a healthier lifestyle and more. If you have a comment on this week’s episode please get back in touch with me either over at HTWeekly.com in comment links for each article or shoot me an email at podmedic@mac.com.

Vetigel Clots Blood Superfast for Your Pets

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This week on the Health Tech Weekly Podcast I have a brand new technology for you that will likely change the way healthcare professionals and emergency responders deal with stopping severe bleeding in just ten seconds. This amazing technology came from an unlikely source when then 17 year-old NYU student Joe Landolina discovered a unique protein gel that when injected into blood, it stops the bleeding quickly and safely.

College Contest Winner Starts Company

Vetigel-Stops-Bleeding-In-Seconds-2Joe won a contest as a college freshman and got the money to startup a new company around his discovery and invention called Suneris. The first application of the blood clotting gel is in the veterinary world with the product called VetiGel which is being tested by 1,000 vets right now.

The technology and discovery came from Joe’s work on a plant derived protein that in its gel form creates an extracellular matrix of proteins and sugars that imitates the cellular matrix of the tissue it’s placed on or in. So put it on skin and it acts like skin, put it on muscle and it acts like muscle, and put it in blood and it forms the clotting matrix of blood attracting fiber and proteins from the blood to its matrix and stopping bleeding fast.

Veterinary Practice First, Then Humans

According to the Suneris site description of VetiGel it is designed exclusively for veterinarians to stop internal and external bleeding. The gel activates blood’s natural clotting process and is made with biocompatible components that can be absorbed directly into the body. By reassembling onto a wound site, VETIGEL mimics the body’s extracellular matrix and accelerates the production of fibrin, which enables the body to clot rapidly.

I’m sure this will migrate to the human treatment world soon so stick around here at HTWeekly.com for more on this as the news is released in the future and if you know a vet, send them to the website. It might just be the thing that saves your pet’s life someday.

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That will wrap up this episode of Health Tech Weekly. Make sure you follow up over at our website, HTWeekly.com, for more information on this and all of our episodes. There are additional resource links, links to trusted resources for living a healthier lifestyle and more. If you have a comment on this week’s episode please get back in touch with me either over at HTWeekly.com in comment links for each article or shoot me an email at podmedic@mac.com.

Wearable Pregnancy Monitor for Pregnant Moms-to-be from Drexel University Team

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This week on the Health Tech Weekly Podcast I have a brand new technology for women with at-risk pregnancy. Monitoring the health of the fetus remotely during pregnancy is a challenge. The existing ultrasound technology requires the patients to remain still during monitoring. But what if you could create a wearable contraction monitor that at-risk moms-to-be could still be out working or caring for their families while still being connected to the monitoring station? That’s what the folks at Drexel University decided to work on.

Pregnant_BlueBringing together people from multiple disciplines, the Drexel team has Tim Kurzweg a professor of electrical and computer engineering, Shima Seiki a professor of Fashion Design, and Dr. Owen Montgomery, OB-GYN chairman at Drexel University College of Medicine. That’s quite a cross disciplinary platform for research! They created a smart fabric that can be worn and connect the monitoring technology from the pregnant patient back to their Doctor’s office or hospital center. The fabric acts as both monitor and antenna using RFID technology. They are getting ready to test the monitor in a clinical trial of pregnant mothers.

This is exciting because this could revolutionize all sorts of remote monitoring setups. Adult heart monitoring, brainwave monitoring or almost anything else. Imagine going to the doctors office and getting a tight fitting t-shirt to wear for the next week while they collect data on your body. It’s just the beginning of an exciting time in medical fashion and fabric design. The Smart Fabric Belly Band is the first of its kind and I’m sure it won’t be the last. Stick around here and come back and check out future episodes here on the Health Tech Weekly show. I’ll be bringing you more on this as it continues to develop and be tested.

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That will wrap up this episode of Health Tech Weekly. Make sure you follow up over at our website, HTWeekly.com, for more information on this and all of our episodes. There are additional resource links, links to trusted resources for living a healthier lifestyle and more. If you have a comment on this week’s episode please get back in touch with me either over at HTWeekly.com in comment links for each article or shoot me an email at podmedic@mac.com.