Printing Organs On 3-D Printer

We might soon have new organs printed for us on demand. Yes, Printed. You may have heard about 3-printers that create 3-D models from a computer aided design model (CAD). A new partnership is bringing together a leading bio-engineering firm and a 3-D design and software company. Check the press release below and tell me what you think.

Organovo Holdings, Inc. (OTCQX: ONVO) (“Organovo”), a creator and manufacturer of functional, three-dimensional human tissues for medical research and therapeutic applications, is working together with researchers at Autodesk, Inc., the leader in cloud-based design and engineering software, to create the first 3D design software for bioprinting.

Printing Organs and Tissues On Demand

Organovo-AutodeskThe software, which will be used to control Organovo’s NovoGen MMX bioprinter, will represent a major step forward in usability and functionality for designing three-dimensional human tissues, and has the potential to open up bioprinting to a broader group of users.

“Autodesk is an excellent partner for Organovo in developing new software for 3D bioprinters,” said Keith Murphy, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer at Organovo. “This relationship will lead to advances in bioprinting, including both greater flexibility and throughput internally, and the potential long-term ability for customers to design their own 3D tissues for production by Organovo.”

“Bioprinting has the potential to change the world,” said Jeff Kowalski, Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer at Autodesk. “It’s a blend of engineering, biology and 3D printing, which makes it a natural for Autodesk. I think working with Organovo to explore and evolve this emerging field will yield some fascinating and radical advances in medical research.”

Organ Transplants To Order Soon?

Nurse_Epidural_surgery_smOrganovo’s 3D bioprinting technology is used to create living human tissues that are three-dimensional, architecturally correct, and made entirely of living human cells. The resulting structures can function like native human tissues, and represent an opportunity for advancement in medical research, drug discovery and development, and in the future, surgical therapies and transplantation.

The Autodesk Research group is dedicated to innovation and discovery ranging from methods to help users learn powerful digital prototyping tools to visualization and simulation techniques that enable designers to achieve new levels of performance. Advancing the state of the art in human-computer interaction, computer graphics and digital design technology, Autodesk Research collaborates openly with researchers at leading universities around the world. The bio/nano/programmable matter group within Autodesk Research is extending this expertise by developing software for the design and simulation of molecular systems and living systems.

About Organovo Holdings, Inc.

Organovo designs and creates functional, three-dimensional human tissues for medical research and therapeutic applications. The company is working in collaboration with pharmaceutical and academic partners to develop human biological disease models in three dimensions that enable therapeutic drug discovery and development. Organovo’s technology can also be applied to create surgical tissues for direct therapy. Their three-dimensional bioprinting technology was selected as one of the “Best Inventions of 2010″ by TIME Magazine. Organovo leads the way in solving complex medical research problems and building the future of medicine. Visit www.organovo.com.

iPhone & iPad Pulse Oximeter

heroIrvine, California – December 13, 2012 – In keeping with its commitment to excellence and innovation, Masimo (NASDAQ: MASI) today announced the debut of the iSpO2™ pulse oximeter cable and sensor with Measure-Through Motion and Low Perfusion Masimo SET® technology for use with iPhone, iPad or iPod touch with 30-pin connector.

iSpO2™ uses the same technology found in Masimo’s breakthrough line of pulse oximeters and Pulse CO-Oximeters™ – the standard-of-care pulse oximetry technology at work in leading hospitals around the world – providing accurate measurements, even during the challenging conditions of motion and low perfusion.

Customers can purchase the iSpO2™ Signal Extraction Pulse Oximeter and use their iPhone, iPad or iPod touch to check their own blood oxygenation (SpO2), pulse rate, and perfusion index measurements for sports and aviation use and is not intended for medical use.

After purchasing the iSpO2™ (available at iSpO2.com and Amazon) and connecting it to an iPhone, iPad or iPod touch, the iSpO2™ application will automatically download. Thereafter, using the iSpO2™ is easy as 1-2-3:ispo2-1

  • Connect the iSpO2™ cable to your iPhone, iPad or iPod touch
  • Slip the iSpO2™ sensor on your ring finger
  • Your results appear on screen

The iSpO2™ Medical, the professional version for medical use, is pending CE Mark and U.S. FDA 510(k) clearance. This product will be made available through Masimo’s existing distribution channels.

“Masimo was founded on a mission to take noninvasive monitoring to new sites and applications,” said Masimo founder and CEO Joe Kiani. “The iSpO2™ for iPhone, iPad or iPod touch with 30-pin connector represents our first consumer product and should create myriad new possibilities with the goal of further empowering people.”

Please visit iSpO2.com for purchasing information.

 

Third World Wheel Chair Innovation (Video)

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Good day and welcome to Health Tech Weekly, the show on technology that helps create a healthier you! I’m your host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic. Before we get into this week’s health tech item, make sure you check here at HTWeekly.com for links to everything covered in this episode, contact information, and more.

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This week in Health Tech I wanted to feature a story that underlines the purpose of this program as well as what is, I believe, the underlying purpose of the health technology industry: To improve the health and lives of individuals in fundamental ways.

Leveraged Freedom Chair Changes Third World

Leveraged-wheelchairThis week we feature the Leveraged Freedom Chair, a project from a member of MIT’s health engineering team to bring a cost-effective solution to a need for multi-terrain wheelchair design. In many parts of the world, individuals who need wheelchairs are unable to use the standard designs to navigate the terrain encountered in their daily lives.  Amos Winter from MIT sought to solve this problem through simple technology and engineering design. The design uses a variable length lever design to vary torque and range of movement based on the amount of work needed to traverse various types of terrain.

What he developed was an all-terrain wheelchair that is powered by levers mounted on a bicycle style assembly that allows easier and faster transport over all types of terrain commonly encountered in the third world. The cost was kept under $200 although there is a high end prototype being developed here in the U.S. for the developed world health marketplace. The design went through several iterations as it was tested with end users in Africa, India and Central America. The wheelchair is lightweight, sized to fit indoors or out, and is repairable using local resources and technologies. Everywhere has a bike repair shop and the materials, sprockets and chains are produced everywhere in the world.

Low Tech Design Makes Big Improvement

While you might think of this as a low tech device to be featured on a health technology program like this, it exemplifies what health technology should do. Whether low tech or high tech, a device must meet a fundamental need and improve health care in ways that can be easily used by the average patient.  I won’t always be focusing on third world solutions like the Leveraged Freedom Chair but I think it’s a great example of how fundamentally simple health improving technology can be. That is what Health Tech Weekly will be all about.

That will wrap up this episode of Health Tech Weekly. Make sure you follow up over at out website, HTWeekly.com, for more information on this and all of our episodes. There are additional resource links, links to trusted resources for living a healthier lifestyle and more. If you have a comment on this week’s episode please get back in touch with me either over at HTWeekly.com in comment links for each article or shoot me an email at podmedic@mac.com.

I’m your host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic. I’ll be back soon with more health technology for you. In the meantime, remember that improving health takes small, simple steps that over time all add up to a healthier you. Why don’t you take a healthier step today?

OmniPod New Smaller Insulin Pump Approved

BEDFORD, MA–(Marketwire – Dec 14, 2012) –  Insulet Corporation (NASDAQ: PODD), the leader in tubeless insulin pump technology, today announced that the Company has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the next-generation OmniPod® Insulin Management System. The new OmniPod insulin pump is more than one-third smaller and one-quarter lighter than the original model, while maintaining the same 200-unit insulin reservoir capacity and easy-to-use features. In addition to the smaller, lighter Pod, the new OmniPod System includes an updated Personal Diabetes Manager (PDM) that also features a series of enhancements.

Pump Smaller Than Ever

OmniPod-with-raspberry-290x290“The OmniPod revolutionized insulin delivery with its tubeless and wireless design when it was introduced in 2005 and today, the next-generation OmniPod raises the bar for insulin pump therapy again,” said Duane DeSisto, President and Chief Executive Officer of Insulet. “We are thrilled to have received FDA approval and it is my hope that our new Omnipod insulin pump will continue to make living with diabetes easier for our customers across the United States.”

“When technology can make diabetes management easier for my patients, they have better clinical outcomes,” said Steve Edelman, MD, Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of California at San Diego and founder of Taking Control of Your Diabetes (TCOYD), a not-for-profit organization with the goal of teaching and motivating patients in diabetes self-care. “As an OmniPod wearer myself, I love its ease of use and no tubing! Now with its smaller and sleeker design, it will make it even easier for more people to take control of their diabetes.”

“Preparations are underway to launch the new OmniPod, including training of healthcare professionals and transitioning the rest of our manufacturing production,” said Mr. DeSisto. “We expect that these initiatives will take approximately two to three months to complete and anticipate our first shipments in the U.S. to occur in late Q1 2013. Like the System itself, converting our current OmniPod users to the new system has been designed to be extremely easy as to ensure a seamless transition.”

Customers are encouraged to keep informed via http://www.MyOmniPod.com/NewOmniPod where the Company will publish its latest information about the exact timing and availability of the new OmniPod System, including details on how current users will be converted. Additionally, current users will receive direct notification from the Company when the conversion process is commencing.

While performing its launch preparation initiatives, Insulet continues to collaborate closely with healthcare providers and patients so they can enjoy the many benefits of the current OmniPod today.

About the OmniPod Insulin Management System
The OmniPod® Insulin Management System is the world’s first tubeless insulin pump. The OmniPod offers people living with insulin-requiring diabetes all the benefits of insulin pump therapy, with freedom and ease. The tubing-free OmniPod insulin pump has just two easy-to-use parts: the discreet, waterproof Pod, which automatically inserts and can be worn on many parts of the body to hold and deliver insulin; and the Personal Diabetes Manager (PDM), a hand-held device that wirelessly programs the Pod, calculates suggested doses and has a built-in blood glucose meter. For more information on the OmniPod insulin pump, please visit: http://www.myomnipod.com.

Paralyzed Woman Eats with Robot Arm

PITTSBURGH, Dec. 16, 2012 – Reaching out to “high five” someone, grasping and moving objects of different shapes and sizes, feeding herself dark chocolate. For Jan Scheuermann and a team of researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and UPMC, accomplishing these seemingly ordinary tasks demonstrated for the first time that a person with longstanding quadriplegia can maneuver a mind-controlled, human-like robot arm in seven dimensions (7D) to consistently perform many of the natural and complex motions of everyday life.

A similar technology was reported in the Health Tech Weekly Episode – Mind Control, Your Computer, & Prosthetics.

Woman Vows to Eat Chocolate BarLandingPage_JanSmilesAtBar

In a study published in the online version of The Lancet, the researchers described the brain-computer interface (BCI) technology and training programs that allowed Ms. Scheuermann, 53, of Whitehall Borough in Pittsburgh, Pa. to intentionally move an arm, turn and bend a wrist, and close a hand for the first time in nine years.

Less than a year after she told the research team, “I’m going to feed myself chocolate before this is over,” Ms. Scheuermann savored its taste and announced as they applauded her feat, “One small nibble for a woman, one giant bite for BCI.”

“This is a spectacular leap toward greater function and independence for people who are unable to move their own arms,” agreed senior investigator Andrew B. Schwartz, Ph.D., professor, Department of Neurobiology, Pitt School of Medicine. “This technology, which interprets brain signals to guide a robot arm, has enormous potential that we are continuing to explore. Our study has shown us that it is technically feasible to restore ability; the participants have told us that BCI gives them hope for the future.”

Degenerative Disease Strikes

In 1996, Ms. Scheuermann was a 36-year-old mother of two young children, running a successful business planning parties with murder-mystery themes and living in California when one day she noticed her legs seemed to drag behind her. Within two years, her legs and arms progressively weakened to the point that she required a wheelchair, as well as an attendant to assist her with dressing, eating, bathing and other day-to-day activities. After returning home to Pittsburgh in 1998 for support from her extended family, she was diagnosed with spinocerebellar degeneration, in which the connections between the brain and muscles slowly, and inexplicably, deteriorate.

“Now I can’t move my arms and legs at all. I can’t even shrug my shoulders,” she said. “But I have come to the conclusion that worrying about something is experiencing it twice. I try to dwell on the good things that I have.”

A friend pointed out an October 2011 video about another Pitt/UPMC BCI research study in which Tim Hemmes, a Butler, Pa., man who sustained a spinal cord injury that left him with quadriplegia, moved objects on a computer screen and ultimately reached out with a robot arm to touch his girlfriend.

“Wow, it’s so neat that he can do that,” Ms. Scheuermann thought as she watched him. “I wish I could do something like that.” She had her attendant call the trial coordinator immediately, and said, “I’m a quadriplegic. Hook me up, sign me up! I want to do that!”

Health Tech Research to the Rescue

On Feb. 10, 2012, after screening tests to confirm that she was eligible for the study, co-investigator and UPMC neurosurgeon Elizabeth Tyler-Kabara, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Neurological Surgery, Pitt School of Medicine, placed two quarter-inch square electrode grids with 96 tiny contact points each in the regions of Ms. Scheuermann’s brain that would normally control right arm and hand movement.

“Prior to surgery, we conducted functional imaging tests of the brain to determine exactly where to put the two grids,” she said. “Then we used imaging technology in the operating room to guide placement of the grids, which have points that penetrate the brain’s surface by about one-sixteenth of an inch.”

The electrode points pick up signals from individual neurons and computer algorithms are used to identify the firing patterns associated with particular observed or imagined movements, such as raising or lowering the arm, or turning the wrist, explained lead investigator Jennifer Collinger, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R), and research scientist for the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System. That intent to move is then translated into actual movement of the robot arm, which was developed by Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Lab.

Two days after the operation, the team hooked up the two terminals that protrude from Ms. Scheuermann’s skull to the computer. “We could actually see the neurons fire on the computer screen when she thought about closing her hand,” Dr. Collinger said. “When she stopped, they stopped firing. So we thought, ‘This is really going to work.’”

Within a week, Ms. Scheuermann could reach in and out, left and right, and up and down with the arm, which she named Hector, giving her 3-dimensional control that had her high-fiving with the researchers. “What we did in the first week they thought we’d be stuck on for a month,” she noted.

Mind Controlled Robot Arm Changes Life

Before three months had passed, she also could flex the wrist back and forth, move it from side to side and rotate it clockwise and counter-clockwise, as well as grip objects, adding up to what scientists call 7D control. In a study task called the Action Research Arm Test, Ms. Scheuermann guided the arm from a position four inches above a table to pick up blocks and tubes of different sizes, a ball and a stone and put them down on a nearby tray. She also picked up cones from one base to restack them on another a foot away, another task requiring grasping, transporting and positioning of objects with precision.

“Our findings indicate that by a variety of measures, she was able to improve her performance consistently over many days,” Dr. Schwartz explained. “The training methods and algorithms that we used in monkey models of this technology also worked for Jan, suggesting that it’s possible for people with long-term paralysis to recover natural, intuitive command signals to orient a prosthetic hand and arm to allow meaningful interaction with the environment.”

In a separate study, researchers also continue to study BCI technology that uses an electrocortigraphy (ECoG) grid, which sits on the surface of the brain rather than slightly penetrates the tissue as in the case of the grids used for Ms. Scheuermann.

In both studies, “we’re recording electrical activity in the brain, and the goal is to try to decode what that activity means and then use that code to control an arm,” said senior investigator Michael Boninger, M.D., professor and chair, PM&R, and director of UPMC Rehabilitation Institute. “We are learning so much about how the brain controls motor activity, thanks to the hard work and dedication of our trial participants. Perhaps in five to 10 years, we will have a device that can be used in the day-to-day lives of people who are not able to use their own arms.”

Next Steps for Health Technology

The next step for BCI technology will likely use a two-way electrode system that can not only capture the intention to move, but in addition, will stimulate the brain to generate sensation, potentially allowing a user to adjust grip strength to firmly grasp a doorknob or gently cradle an egg.

After that, “we’re hoping this can become a fully implanted, wireless system that people can actually use in their homes without our supervision,” Dr. Collinger said. “It might even be possible to combine brain control with a device that directly stimulates muscles to restore movement of the individual’s own limb.”

For now, Ms. Scheuermann is expected to continue to put the BCI technology through its paces for two more months, and then the implants will be removed in another operation.

“This is the ride of my life,” she said. “This is the rollercoaster. This is skydiving. It’s just fabulous, and I’m enjoying every second of it.”

In addition to Drs. Collinger, Tyler-Kabara, Boninger and Schwartz, study co-authors include Brian Wodlinger, Ph.D., John E. Downey, Wei Wang, Ph.D., and Doug Weber, Ph.D., all of PM&R; and Angus J. McMorland, Ph.D., and Meel Velliste, Ph.D., of the Department of Neurobiology, Pitt School of Medicine.

The BCI projects are funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, National Institutes of Health grant 8KL2TR000146-07, the U.S. Department of Veteran’s Affairs, the UPMC Rehabilitation Institute and the University of Pittsburgh Clinical and Translational Science Institute.

Misfit Shine Tracks Daily Activity (Video)

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Good day and welcome to Health Tech Weekly, the show on technology that helps create a healthier you! I’m your host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic. Before we get into this week’s health tech item, make sure you head over to our site at HTWeekly.com for links to everything covered in this episode, contact information and more.

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Sleek, Chic, Fitness Tracking

In this episode of Health Tech Weekly, I thought we’d talk about something very simple. How active are you? How do you know if you’re even meeting your fitness goals? Pedometers are ok but don’t always measure all activity and don’t always deal well with water based activities. The Misfit Shine is calls itself “an elegant, wireless activity tracker.”

The Shine clips on a belt or can be paired with optional accessories to allow it to be worn on the wrist or on a necklace. The shine is powered by a watch battery with a projected 6 month battery life and boy is it tiny. It’s about the size of two quarters back to back and weighs even less. The Misfit Shine pairs with an iOS device app that tracks all activity including swimming, cycling, and other non-walking activities unlike a pedometer. The Shine is designed to be sturdy and long-lasting with an all-metal casing for the most active person you know.

Check Fitness Progress on the Go

You don’t have to check your iPhone or iPad to see where you stand on your daily activity goal. Tiny micro holes around the edge light up with a tap to show how far you are for the day. When you complete the circle of lights, you’ve met your goal. That’s pretty cool.

The Misfit Shine is scheduled to begin shipping to the first customers in March 2013 with the second round shipping in April, according to the funding page on Indiegogo. It’s priced at $99 with family and even company pricing available. If you’ve been looking for a way to help you reach your daily activity goals with a sleek and elegant device that looks really cool, too, the Shine just might be for you. You can find a link to the Misfit Shine development page in the show notes for this episode at HTWeekly.com or on their funding page at IndieGoGo.com.

That will wrap up this episode of Health Tech Weekly. Make sure you follow up over at out website, HTWeekly.com, for more information on this and all of our episodes. There are additional resource links, links to trusted resources for living a healthier lifestyle and more. If you have a comment on this week’s episode please get back in touch with me either over at HTWeekly.com in comment links for each article or shoot me an email at podmedic@mac.com.

I’m your host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic. I’ll be back soon with more health technology for you. In the meantime, remember that, even with technology and advanced medications, improving your health still takes small, simple steps that over time all add up to a healthier you. Why don’t you take a healthier step today?

Wireless Thermometer Connects to Smartphone (Video)

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Good day and welcome to Health Tech Weekly, the show on technology that helps create a healthier you! I’m your host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic. Before we get into this week’s health tech item, make sure you head over to our site at HTWeekly.com for links to everything covered in this episode, contact information and more.

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iPhone App Calms Anxious Parents

In this episode of Health Tech Weekly, let’s look at a useful tool for parents with sick children. Parents with young children don’t always know when their child’s temperature spikes and their fever goes up. This can create a lot of angst and sleepless nights for parents. Enter the Raiing Wireless Thermometer a thermometer that can alert a mobile device when at child gets a fever. This device just received FDA approval for children aged 2 and older.

The device is worn under the armpit attached by an adhesive strip. The child can wear this when sick and temperature fluctuations are communicated and tracked by the app on the mobile device. The app is currently available in the iOS app store. The wireless thermometer connects via bluetooth or WiFi network and according to the company website it “delivers the real time body temperature to you as if you were always at bed side.”

App Alerts When Fever Strikes

The App can be set to alert the parent when a target temperature is reached meaning that nighttime medications can be managed when they are needed without waking the child or parent up to take a manual temperature. And because the monitoring is in realtime even if a worried parent wakes up, they can quickly check to see if their child is feverish without ever getting out of their own bed.

The adhesive that holds the monitor in place is non-toxic and hypo allergenic and the wireless thermometer itself can store up to 72 hours of data without synchronizing to an iPhone or iPad and there is a cloud based service that can be used to tie in with remote healthcare monitoring as well making this a perfect solution of monitoring in certain home health care situations like the health of elderly parents and relatives. The company has no other products listed but reportedly has other wireless health monitors in the works that would presumably work in a similar fashion.

That’s the Raiing Wireless Thermometer and it should be showing up in pharmacies and the health care aisle of your local markets soon. Find out more information at the company website links in the show notes and at RAIING.com.

Stay Tuned for More Health Tech

That will wrap up this episode of Health Tech Weekly. Make sure you follow up over at out website, HTWeekly.com, for more information on this and all of our episodes. There are additional resource links, links to trusted resources for living a healthier lifestyle and more. If you have a comment on this week’s episode please get back in touch with me either over at HTWeekly.com in comment links for each article or shoot me an email at HTWeekly@gmail.com.

I’m your host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic. I’ll be back soon with more health technology for you. In the meantime, remember that, even with technology and advanced medications, improving your health still takes small, simple steps that over time all add up to a healthier you. Why don’t you take a healthier step today?

HT Weekly Goes to CES 2013 (Video)

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Coming up in January I’ll be joining the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) 2013 coverage team from the Tech Podcast network for the second year, focusing on medical technology and digital health products. Together with the other tech podcast network hosts, we’ll be covering the consumer electronics show so you’ll feel as if you were there yourself!

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Last year, we streamed live from the exhibit hall during all four days of CES, interviewing vendors, technology leaders and providing commentary on the event. All the while, multiple camera teams were out combing the floors of the various exhibit halls to give you hand picked coverage of specific technology gems personally selected by your favorite TPN podcasters.

As a nurse and a paramedic, from the ProMed Network, TPN’s sister network, I bring the viewpoint of the health professional to the various medical, health and fitness devices and services presented at the show. I’ve already picked out some amazing standout health care gadgets to show to you as part of the TPN coverage and I’m going to be looking for more as I roam this huge event.

CES is a Huge Event

With more than five football fields of gadgets to comb through, we’re going to cover more ground, gathering the best gadgets and new technologies of the show, in a way you could never manage on your own. We’ll have the TPN experts on all sorts of technology there, from my health focused coverage, to home theater, photography, travel and even geocaching, the TPN team will be your one stop shop for the best from CES!

So join us and millions of fellow viewers for live coverage from CES 2013. Visit us at TPN.tv for the live stream and for releases after the show of our best of picks. That’s TPN.tv for all the live coverage and nearly 300 best of picks from our team.

And don’t forget to check out my shows for at NursingShow.com, MedicCast.tv, and the brand new Health Tech weekly show here at HTWeekly.com. You can also follow what I’m doing at CES on Twitter at Twitter.com/podmedic.  I’m Jamie Davis, the Podmedic, and I’ll be coming to you soon from CES 2013 with the rest of the Tech Podcasts team. Until then, stay safe and stay tuned here to TPN.tv!

Portable Bladder Scanner a Game Changer? (Video)

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Good day and welcome to Health Tech Weekly, the show on technology that helps create a healthier you! I’m your host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic. Before we get into this week’s health tech item, make sure you head over to our site at HTWeekly.com for links to everything covered in this episode, contact information and more.

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Why a Bladder Scanner?

In this episode of Health Tech Weekly, I wanted to look at a new USB Bladder Scanner that recently received FDA approval. Ewwwww, really a bladder scanner? Yeah, a bladder scanner. I know it seems kind of gross but the part I wanted to pay attention to is the USB part of it.

Vitacon, a company out of Trondhiem, Norway was founded in 1985 and has been producing bladder scanning ultrasound devices for some time. The advent of the USB based system is important because it can work with any windows based computer with a usb port and the installed software.  This brings the bladder scanning tool into a much more affordable target marketplace including smaller and rural health centers and the home health care arena.

Home Health Care Applications

As the population continues to age, bladder dysfunction will continue to be a growing problem. The Vitascan LT USB system joins many other basic diagnostic tools, formerly limited to hospital and specialist use, into the home health and primary care systems of care.

As we continue to focus on healthcare reform and cost reduction in the U.S. diagnostic and assessment tools like this and those attached to mobile applications will continue to be popular options for those who previously had to order diagnostic tests in outpatient or specialist settings just to rule out problems that could be easily diagnosed with a portable scanning system like this this one.

More Health Tech to Come

Look for more coverage on these types of tools moving forward so you can recognize the tools your health care professionals are using to assess you. If you want to watch the full Vitascan video, check out their website at Vitacon.com. That’s VITACON.com. You can also follow this and other health tech updates like this one I found at MedGadget.com.

That will wrap up this episode of Health Tech Weekly. Make sure you follow up over at out website, HTWeekly.com, for more information on this and all of our episodes. There are additional resource links, links to trusted resources for living a healthier lifestyle and more. If you have a comment on this week’s episode please get back in touch with me either over at HTWeekly.com in comment links for each article or shoot me an email at Podmedic@mac.com.

I’m your host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic. I’ll be back soon with more health technology for you. In the meantime, remember that, even with technology and advanced medications, improving your health still takes small, simple steps that over time all add up to a healthier you. Why don’t you take a healthier step today?